Airbrushing Question

K

keefer649

Guest
Hello All. I am looking at possibly getting myself a starter airbrush to paint up my costume, but am not sure if I will ever use it again once complete (so I dont want to blow alot of cash). Not to mention, the skills are somewhat lacking in the art department. Anyways, kindof looking to go on the not too expensive area, I tried one(Testors) with a can of air.....didnt last long at all...quickly returned it, garbage.So ...I am looking at getting a compressor, and a low end (beginner model)Badger Airbrush. Compressors specifically meant for airbrushes are quite expensive around my area...would a compressor such as this do the job????

www.canadiantire.ca/assor...earch=true

Hope that isnt an absolutely ridiculous question!! Its meant for tools and inflating, but would it not work?

Thanx all.
 
T

The Big Gunns

Guest
If you are looking for a good lower end airbrush go with the Omni 3000. Ive used them, they work fine. They are $59 (US)

I would stay away from Badgers.. in my experience they are crap.

As for your
compressor.. your link isnt showing anything. If its a compressor thats meant for infalting tires, then it isnt made to be run for long periods of time and it will burn out on you.

Im using one like this... cost $45 (US)
Compresor LINK
~Mel
 
K

keefer649

Guest
Thanks for the info, not sure why the link doesnt work for ya. Its not just meant for inflating, would have multiple uses, just not sure of what the duty cycle is for it.

0587958_450_CC_4da6d.jpg


Regarding the Omni 3000, any search I do on that states that its made by Badger?!?!?
 
A

alpha pred

Guest
If you check E-bay you can pick up an IWATA Eclipse for a decent price!! Good luck!
 
T

ta2pro

Guest
in my experience do go for a badger or any airbrush you desire.badger 360(i can get a dot on accident).iwata,paasche,badger-it does'nt matter.what truly matters first is the skill and patience you are willing to sacrifice to overcome the airbrush-not vice versa.next is knowing your mediums(and i'm not talking in tarrot,lol).i destroyed my first airbrush i saved for at 16 because noone offered me advise when i asked.do not listen to someone,w/no matter how much experience they have,about negative talk of a particular brush.i've done $1k paintings w/ceramacoat and nylon brushes and you'd never know the difference.but if you have the skill grab anything you can.once you conquer it-move on to bigger and better guns.be knowledgeable of viscosity of your paints.certain brushes are friendly w/certain mediums.as different acrylics are easier to dilute,most companies these days offer so many "ready to shoot" acrylics(createx,auto air,freak flex-yes,that is a badger paint) because of growing needs for the average illustrator.hope this helped.i'll be gald to point you in a direction that you are comfortable with.
 
T

The Big Gunns

Guest
Ive tried my share of airbrushes.. and Ive been gun slinging for 16 years now. The reason why I like Iwatas is because of the trigger. It is very smooth and wont make you finger hurt after an hour of spraying. They can also handle a wide variety of mediums. They also break down the least of all the airbrushes I've tried.

Tat2pro.. he asked for opinions and that's what he was given. Doesn't mean mine or anyone elses was right.... just our own personal experiences.
~Mel
 
Y

yautja clone

Guest
You decide on the airbrush, but I think the compressor and tank will do just fine.

I have one identical to the pic below made by Larin. Bought it for around $50 and it has worked great for all my painting needs.

A000333.jpg
 
K

keefer649

Guest
Thanx for all the feedback, muchly appreciated. I am keeping my eye on e-bay...some nice items up for grabs, should be able to snag a compressor and a brush for $100 ish shipped. There was actually a set of a Paasche Airbrush and a Badger Compressor that ended up going for $59. Came real close. One more question of opinion.....as I am a complete beginner at this, would it make a difference if I grabbed a single action brush instead of a dual action? I have started doing some reading on the net on the "how to's" of airbrushing, and am thinking a single action may be easier to learn on? Again keep in mind, this will be a 'learning' tool more than anything....and its what I will be using to paint the skin of my costume.

Thanx!
 
T

ta2pro

Guest
a dual action will move,and feel,more freelly than single action.in a single action you only operate the airflow while dialing in a specific spray width/pattern.w/a dual action you control flow+air produding not only better controlled lines,but certain effects)spatters,splatters,etc).honest to goodness just try a paasche vl or vls.i know it will suffice in what you're looking for.they are semi comfortable(little bulky)durable(nearly clutz proof-aka dropping),and little breakdown in cleaning.spend a little bit more money for peace of mind and start out w/a dual action.then you can easily move up to better grade aibrushes once you get the feel for your new hobby!
 
T

The Mortal Immortal

Guest
ta2pro
do not listen to someone,w/no matter how much experience they have,
My first airbrush was a paasche VL I got from my mother on one of my birthdays back in the 80's. I still use the same one today, and I still think its a good airbrush. True it not the brush that makes you good, it how you master the one you have. I have all different kinds of airbrushes from Paasche, Badger, Binks, Capital, Aztex, and Iwata. I find them to all be good, but each of the brushes always does something better then one other.

This is just my point of veiw and I'm not trying to start an arguments or any thread war.
 
K

keefer649

Guest
I've been eyeing the Paasche VL, seems to be goin for a pretty decent price. Thanks again for all your thoughts, its not meant to start a scrap at all, just asking for opinions, which we all have differences on. Peace.
 
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