Molds?

S

Supreme Hunter

Guest
Hey everyone. I was just wondering if anyone could tell me how I would go about making a mold for my dread rings I made. Also If you could also add in what would i use to fill the mold to actually make the dread ring. Thanks

-Chris
 
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Maverick118

Guest
Most likely use a silcone for the mold, even silicone caluking if you need it to be cheap. You could do a latex snap mold Silicone would be the best bet as there's little shrinkage. As for what material to cast in? Most seem to use resin and you can get a nice line in filler powders to give the resin all kinds of sheens and looks, you can get metallic powders to make it look like metal. Hope this helps some.
 
F

fantazar

Guest
While we're on the subject of Molds, how does one go about making a mold for the Shin Armor?
I've created my Armor that I want to use as the model, but now I'm stuck as to what and how to make the mold.

Do I layer the outside in Latex then peel it off when dry and continue layering from the inside?
Or do I box it and create a 2-part Plaster Mold?

Any help appreciated.

Thx
 
P

pirkleations

Guest
Fantazar,

If your shin armor is sculpted in oil-based clay, do the 2-piece plaster mold. That's the best way to go for latex armor parts.

You may not have to "box it" if you go with a shell-style mold. Just place some seam shims, do several layers of plaster and jute/burlpap up to an inch on one side, let that set, get with some vasaline, and then do the second side. t will make for a much lighter, but very strong mold.

Don't forget to read up on plaster mold-making online if you haven't doen it much.

DangerDavey
 
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Maverick118

Guest
A;so it depends on what your finished armour will be made of. Plaster molds for latex parts, latex or silicone molds for fibreglass or resin parts.
 
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fantazar

Guest
Thanks very much Pirks for the help.

I had the idea that brushing the plaster onto the outside surface would crack and fall off. If this is not the case, I'll go ahead with that plan as it seems easier.

I'm not sure what you mean by seam shims and burlapping, so I'll read up on those.

Thanks again
 
F

fantazar

Guest
Hi Mav

I'm wanting the parts to be Latex as it's more flexible and not so rigid, so I'm looking to make the mold from plaster.

Thanks
 
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pirkleations

Guest
Fantazar,

Normally, when you are doing a 2-part mold of any kind, it is important to establish the seam line where the mold halves meet.

Lately, I've been using thin pieces of plastic cut from gallon milk jugs or walls of more clay. I did my Elder mask mold with the clay wall method.

Pirk1_Predheadmaskmolding02.jpg


Set up the clay wall where you want the seam and then start the first half of the plaster mold up to that edge. Then, when the plaster cured enough(solid when you rap it with your knuckle), you can pull the clay wall away, put vasaline on exposed half of the cured plaster(This will prevent the plaster from sticking to the second side)

Repeat the plastering process for the second side and pull apart the halves when the plaster is completely cured.(24 hours is best)

If everything goes as planned, you will end up with a 2-part mold like this...

revisedpredheadmold01.jpg


The plastic shim method works in that way as well for nearly any 2-part mold project.

Definitely do some research for more details on the process. My description is basically just an overview.

Hope this helps!

DangerDavey
 
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Maverick118

Guest
I use shims pretty well exclusively now, as I get a really tight fit on the mold and that means less seaming to be done when the final pull is made. Which in turn means better quality and finish to your piece.

image0099.jpg

image0097.jpg

image0098.jpg

image0096.jpg


Here's a few pics of the dividing line on my pred head..

When making a mold you do what is termed a "splash" or "beauty coat" it is a thin mixture of plaster or UC30 that captures all the detail. after that has gelled you add a thicker batch of plaster and reapeat the same proccess to build up the thickness of the mold. The last couple of layers generally have strips of burlap or sack cloth layered in to give the mold strength. I usually finish of the mold with a thick layer after this and smooth everything over so there are no jagged areas to catch on anything.
 
F

fantazar

Guest
Fantastic tips guys and thanks also for the demonstration pics.

This gives me a much better insight to the terms used in mold making and also clarifies a few doubts I had.
Appreciated very much for your help.

So basically, you layer the sculpt with plaster like you do a Latex Mold or piece, to a strong thickness, only adding some mesh between to strengthen the mold.
Makes sense.


Will give it a go.
Wish me luck
 
P

pirkleations

Guest
"Good Luck!"

"Wish me monsters."

~Willow and Buffy from Buffy the Vampire Slayer
 
C

CyberPred

Guest
Agreed,

Shims are the way to go. Just put them into the clay where you want the seam to be. That way you will not have to sculpt your clay against the shim like you do in a clay wall.

Take some alcohol and use it on a sponge to smooth out your sculpt.

Remember to seal your whole sculpt with a clear Krylon before laying down the splash coat.After the first half sets up apply Vaseline to the plaster so it will release real easy from the first plaster half.

What type of Key are you making? Gutter,Registration?

Cary
 
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MoviesColin

Guest
Same subject-

Can I use fiberglass to mold a sculpture to cast in latex?

Fiberglass is much stronger and lighter than plaster...
 
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Maverick118

Guest
If you're running foam latex and have a core for the mold Colin then I'd say yes, as Fibreglass is used a great deal by those in the UK that work in the FX industry as we have a great difficulty getting the gypsum you guys use over the pond. But if you're going to do a normal pre vulcanised latex then the best bet would be a stone mold. Fibreglass is no pourous it won't leech the moisture from the latex. You can of course fill the fibre glass mold with latex and then dump it out and lett the thin layer left behind gel and repeat the proccess over and over again. But it'll take a great deal of time to build the thickness required for a durable mask mate. It's not impossible but time consuming.

Oh and whilst we're on the subject, use dulling spray in conjunction with the Crystal Clear, use the clear first then spray the dulling spray on after you've done this will stop the splash/beauty coat that captures the detail of the sculpt from beading and running off. This way you can get a nice quick build up of your splash coat before moving on the the thicker layers of plaster/stone for the mold. Don't forget to use burlap strips or plaster bandages for strength, or as I use now coconut fibres.
 
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