plasma caster virgin

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NightSlayer666

Guest
ok i got all my clay an hydro cal finally, so i started on what i thought would be an easy 1st project, hahahaha here lies my problem, it will look like "a" plasma caster but not like anyones here, trying to go custom on this and not copy anyones as well as not copying the original, my question is this, how in the hell do you guys get all those fine, little details in the clay sculpt? Do u imbed things to get some of the shapes? Afer you embed them and youre ready to cast do you hafta spray the whole sculpt with release agent so the ebedded objects dont stick to the latex? example one of the plasma casters on this site has tank treads on the top for detail, how was this accomplished without the treads pulling off of the clay and sticking to the latex or silicone? I know all this takes patience and so far ive got 8 hrs into this sculpt, general shape is there but lacking details. PLEASE HELP
 
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BadMoonBlood

Guest
What are you casting it out of? If you want a resin piece, you need to cast it in silicone. If you want a latex piece, you need to cast it out of hydrocal. (BTW... Hydrocal is not as strong as Ultracal.. so you wont get as many pulls if you use that)

You will have to do a 2 part mold.. meaning.. you have to divide the piece in half and mold it in 2 sections.

You can sculpt the detail pieces or you can kitbash a model kit, find odds and ends around the house, kids toy parts.. what ever looks good.

Yes you do have to seal the clay before you cast it. When I am casting something in ultracal, I use Kryolan Krystal Clear.

Good luck and I am looking forward to seeing pics ~Mel(aka The Big Gunns)
 
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pirkleations

Guest
Nightslayer,

BadMoonBlood's got the right idea.

When I sculpted my Pirk-1 Hybrid, I used a combination of super-sculpey, resin, some texture parts from misc. model kits and made sure that there were few "undercut parts" that would snag or grab the mold material. I filled in underneath and around the protruding bits with putty. The I gave it a couple of coats of sealer and paint to help smooth out the entire piece. If only a couple of texture pieces come off in the process, it's nothing a little super-glue cannot fix.
My new cannon is going to my buddy's shop to mold today and I'm hoping that it comes out of the first mold well enough for a second or third mold. Two-piece molds are indeed easier to work with than a one-piece, but you've got to make sure that you can conceal your seams or make it nearly invisible, depending on how picky you are. I had a one-piece silicone mold that I split down one side only for a minimal seam line. It worked great for my last cannon. Also, use a spray mold release on the master before starting the mold. You'll thank yourself later!!
You can also bust apart some plastic toys to make a more unique cannon. It would save you quite a bit of sculpting time and would work well with nearly any soft mold material.

Good luck on your design! Can't wait to see progress pictures!!!

DangerDavey
 
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NightSlayer666

Guest
Thanx but why do you need to clear coat the clay before you cast it. Theres no way you can reuse the clay after you clear coat it is there? Instead of clear coat why not just dust it with baby powder or spray it with cooking spray or silicone spray?, Im goin for a resin ending product so silicone will be a friend....or enemy of mine shortly.
 
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The Big Gunns

Guest
You have to clear the final clay pice.. and yes the clay can be reused. You especially need to seal it if you are working with silicone. ~Mel
 
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Savage Yautja

Guest
Does sealing the clay before molding with Ultra Cal also apply to oil based clay sculpts or just to water based clays?
 
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carlart

Guest
The prototype doesn't necessarily have to be strictly clay. If it's easier to take existing rudimentary shapes like tubes, etc., and build off of them with clay, then so be it. If you're going to kit bash, I would suggest using model tank parts, they are more visually interesting.

I used Monster Makers oil based clay on my cannon because I like the way it hardens at room temperature, allowing you to "chisel" features in it. The hardened sculpt is easier to handle without fear of squashing features that would be lost with soft clay. Whatever you decide, use a non sulphur based clay because sulphur interferes with the curing of silicone molds (which is why you should seal the sculpt). Personally, I would suggest you go the silicone mold and resin cast route, latex cannons don't have enough realism, and you can't wire them up for lighting effects later on. I will be posting a "How To" on silicone molding in a week or so---stay tuned.

carlart
Lairtag.jpg
 
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The Big Gunns

Guest
This silicone will cure against oil based clay:
Quantum silicone

Mark- its good to seal the clay. It makes it easier to remove from the mold. Also- it helps to protect the sculpt when you build your clay wall. ~Mel
 
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Savage Yautja

Guest
Thanks Mel. Love getting information from experience and talented people like you and Carl among others.
 
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NightSlayer666

Guest
Tanx to all who answered this post, your words of wisdom have helped me answer a few questions that have been worrying me about upcomming events that will, im sure make me wanna kill a few more brain cells. Hopefully ill be posting a few pics of what i have done so far in a few days,
 
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